Dominator Rating, Height-Adjusted Speed Score, and WR Draft Rankings

With the draft a couple of days away, it’s a good time to unveil the official Banana Stand 2012 Wide Receiver Draft Rankings. I’m an extreme skeptic of eyeball evaluations for a variety of reasons I won’t go into, but here’s the crux of the matter: Everything you can see on tape is expressed in the stats … if you have the right stats. We probably aren’t there yet in football, but we’re closing in. (Well, not everything. Work ethic and character matter a lot. Unfortunately, they’re often no less inscrutable.)

Here’s a brief description of the stats used here:

Dominator Rating

If you’ve read the Fantasy Douche’s excellent book, Game Plan, you know he’s got a lot of intriguing ideas for improving NFL decision-making through the use of statistical analysis. One of my favorites is the suggestion that market share of collegiate yards and TDs is a better barometer of future performance than raw yardage and TD numbers. For the time being, I’m referring to this as the Dominator Rating, not only because players who excel in this metric have been dominant players in college but because they dominated the looks on their own teams.

In terms of predicting NFL success, any number over .50 – which roughly corresponds to having caught 50% of your team’s yards and TDs – projects as an NFL superstar or Top 10 overall pick value. .45-.50 is excellent (roughly Top 15 pick value), .40-.45 very good (Top 20 pick), .35-.40 (late first, early second), .30-35 (second round to third round), below .30 (middle round pick). Of course, DR in isolation only provides part of the picture. Almost equally important is the receiver’s physical profile.

Height-Adjusted Speed Score

When Bill Barnwell developed the Speed Score for RBs, the same metric didn’t seem to work for WRs. The reason it doesn’t work is because height plays a big role at the receiving position. Almost every legitimate No. 1 WR at the NFL level is 6’1” or taller. My Height-adjusted Speed Score (HaSS) attempts to fix the problem. HaSS is scaled in the same way as Barnwell’s original Speed Score, with 100 being a solid draftable score, anything over 110 being excellent, and anything over 120 suggesting complete physical dominance. In case you’re wondering, since 1999 the No. 1 HaSS is by Calvin Johnson (143). No. 3 is Vincent Jackson (131). No. 5 is Julio Jones (127), and No. 6 will show up in these rankings.

Target Percentage/Yards Per Target

Bill Connelly at Football Study Hall has provided target data for college WRs back to 2005. This is a huge contribution to the statistical evaluation of collegiate WRs. While I hope to do more with it in the future, I’ve included these numbers in the current rankings mostly for illustrative purposes.

Agility Score

This is the combination of the short shuttle and 3-Cone times. My research for PFF shows this strongly correlates to passing down abilities in running backs. Early study suggests this is a less important metric for receivers, but some successful slot receivers have had extraordinary times in this area. I’ve noted it here for a couple of big, supposedly plodding receivers who may possess deceptive lateral explosion.

Unfortunately, we don’t have access to my two favorite PFF stats for NFL players – yards per route and average depth of target – but some NFL teams might and hopefully industrious individuals out there will provide that information in the coming years.

One final note: I doubt the WRs in this class are as far apart as traditional scouting methods suggest. More important than the rankings are the projected value numbers I give with each blurb.

1. Justin Blackmon

Blackmon probably isn’t Calvin Johnson or Randy Moss, but plenty of ‘possession’ receivers are successful No. 1s at the NFL level, especially if they are TD scorers. Although Blackmon’s production plummeted in his final season, he still recorded a .37 in Dominator Rating. In 2010, his .48 was at the elite level. He recorded a whopping 12 yards per target that season. Blackmon’s Height-adjusted Speed Score of 100* is not particularly good, which gives him more of a young Anquan Boldin-type comparison. (Fantasy owners should remember that Boldin exploded as a rookie on a bad team that was still a year away from selecting Larry Fitzgerald.)

Projected Value: 7-15 Overall Projected Selection: 5-10 Overall

2. Stephen Hill

Hill’s Height-adjusted Speed Score of 125 is the 6th best on record. His .46 Dominator Rating was second best among 2011 WRs, although it’s worth questioning whether the formula accurately applies to such an extreme ball control squad. Hill wasn’t nearly as dominant as Demaryius Thomas – whose .55 DR was among the best ever – but scouting downgrades due to his lack of raw numbers are probably overblown. Scouts question his polish and suddenness off the line, but those same concerns were voiced for Calvin Johnson and seem pretty silly now.

Projected Value: 15-20  Projected Selection: 15-32

3. Alshon Jeffery

Like Blackmon, Jeffery had a massive season in 2010 before falling off in 2011. His supposed conditioning and character concerns have knocked down his stock, but Jeffery is probably the most physically dominant receiver in the class. He posted a .42 DR in 2010 and averaged 11.5 yards per target on 36% target percentage. Both numbers dwarf any season posted by Michael Floyd, another physically talented receiver with at least mild off-field issues. Jeffery didn’t run at the Combine but recorded times in the 4.48 to 4.55 area at his Pro Day. If we use the most conservative number, it translates into a 103 HaSS considering his 6’3”, 216 pound (and fluctuating) frame. Jeffery is a risk/reward pick, but if he falls to the top of the 2nd Round as projected, he becomes a no-brainer.

Projected Value: 15-20 Projected Selection: 25-40

4. Marvin McNutt

The Fantasy Douche is on a personal crusade to raise the profile of McNutt, and he has a convert here. Consider that McNutt has averaged more yards per target than Michael Floyd in both of the last two seasons. His Dominator Rating of .46 is very good and places him in a virtual dead heat with Hill and Mohamed Sanu for second. His HaSS of 103 is solid if not elite. Scouts obviously don’t care for him, but at 6’2”, 216, he fits the needs of NFL teams exactly.

Projected Value: 20-35  Projected Selection: Third Round

5. Reuben Randle

Concerns about Randle center around his mundane yardage total last season (930), but he averaged a strong 10.7 yards per target in a weak passing offense. Randle’s HaSS of 101 is starter quality, and he possesses prototypical No. 1 WR size at 6’3”, 210. Randle’s DR of .41 places him solidly in the first round range.

Projected Value: 25-35 Projected Selection: 25-35 Overall

6. A.J. Jenkins

Jenkins is another player inexplicably buzz-free as the draft nears. Of similar stature to Kendall Wright, Jenkins is much faster and has a better collegiate resume if you can see beyond the raw statistics. Jenkins led college football in target percentage in 2011 and finished second in 2010. His Dominator Rating of .55 puts him in the range of players like Megatron, Demaryius Thomas, and Hakeem Nicks. Jenkins is knocked in these rankings for only being 6’0”, 190, but if you’re going to take a smaller receiver, Jenkins is clearly the one to target.

Projected Value: 25-35  Projected Selection: Late Second to Early Third

7. Dwight Jones

Jones has had a disastrous offseason, struggling to endear himself to coaches at the Senior Bowl and management types at the Combine. Despite this, he possesses massive upside at his probable draft slot. For someone who supposedly struggled to run proper routes in offseason workouts, Jones’ 77% catch percentage offers a striking counterpoint. At 10.8 yards per route, he bests most of the receivers scouts rank ahead of him. Moreover, his .41 DR represents borderline first round value and his 111 HaSS is elite. I’m perhaps being overly sensitive to character concerns here, because otherwise Jones would be ranked even higher.

Projected Value: 33-64  Projected Selection: Fourth Round

8. Michael Floyd

Floyd possesses a very good Height-adjusted Speed Score (113), but probably plays slower than that. The Notre Dame prospect logged pedestrian yards per target numbers both of the last two seasons. In 2011, he caught 69% of his passes and yet only averaged 8 ypt. Floyd’s .39 DR this past season is probably more indicative of early second round value. In 2010, his .36 DR finished a hair behind Juron Criner, a similar WR who can be had in a much more favorable draft slot.

Projected Value: 33-64  Projected Selection: 12-21

9. Chris Givens

There’s been plenty of discussion of whether Kendall Wright really is fast enough to be an elite NFL receiver at his height, but far less attention has been paid to the proven speed receivers. Givens’ Dominator Rating of .41 is very good for a smaller receiver, and he averaged 9.9 yards per target in 2011. Givens height could be a problem at the NFL level, but his HaSS of 99.1 projects to starting value.

Projected Value: 45-64 Projected Selection: Third Round

10. Brian Quick

Quick is a little tricky because Appalachian State plays in the FCS, but his Dominator Rating of .48 is still very impressive and would rank second if you directly compare it to the numbers accumulated at BCS schools. It would be easier to discount if Quick hadn’t also posted a Height-adjusted Speed Score of 108. At 6’4”, 220, Quick could eventually emerge as a No. 1 WR if his drafting team can show patience.

Projected Value: 45-64  Projected Selection: Second Round

11. Juron Criner

Criner’s 2011 injury destroyed any chance of finishing as a 1st Round pick, but his 2010 season was quite impressive. His .38 Dominator Rating bested A.J. Green, Julio Jones, Michael Floyd, and Kendall Wright that year. Criner also averaged 10.4 yards per target, which speaks to better vertical skills than many of the receivers projected ahead of him. Criner falls due to a HaSS of 95, although his abysmal 4.68 40 may have represented less than full recovery from injury. At 6’2”, 224, Criner has perfect size for the NFL game.

Projected Value: 45-64  Projected Selection: Third Round

12. Tommy Streeter

After running a 4.4 at 6’4”, 219, Streeter is left with a Height-adjusted Speed Score in the rarified air of 123. Streeter hasn’t generated the buzz of Stephen Hill, instead seemingly discounted due to his paucity of raw stats. The advanced numbers tell a different story. Streeter’s Dominator Rating of .33 barely trails Kendall Wright, and his 10.5 yards per target is far superior to players like Michael Floyd.

Projected Value: 45-60 Projected Selection: Fifth Round

13. Kendall Wright

Skeptics will assume Wright’s ranking is meant for shock effect, but the opposite is actually true. It was very difficult to put Wright so low, because it will destroy this list’s credibility in the eyes of scouting adherents. In the end, being true to the concept is more important. This draft is so deep at the WR position that Wright’s profile simply doesn’t justify a higher rating. Wright’s Dominator Rating of .36 ranks 13th among WRs expected to be taken this weekend, and his HaSS of 83 is so bad it’s not going to look pretty even if you adjust his 40 down significantly for the supposed early hand movement.

The best argument in favor of Wright is the elite 11.5 yards per target he averaged last season, and the fact that he was the target on an impressive 34% of Baylor’s passes. While Wright is actually not very similar to Greg Jennings as some suggest – the Western Michigan alum posted far better numbers in both DR and HaSS – Wright’s profile shouldn’t be seen as a death sentence for his NFL career. While few successful NFL receivers have posted a HaSS below 90, the electric Steve Smith notched an 88, while deep threat Mario Manningham recorded an 81. In the end, the closest recent comparison is probably Titus Young, a player with deceptively high yardage totals and a discouraging size/speed profile. Young had a solid rookie season but was a definite overdraft with Torrey Smith still on the board.

Projected Value: 45-64  Projected Selection: 15-35

14. Mohamed Sanu

All of the above receivers seem to have potential upside as a No. 1 WR, elite slot guy, or vertical threat. Although Sanu may have WR2 upside, he seems like a very safe pick as a future contributor. Only A.J. Jenkins saw a higher percentage of his team’s targets in 2011, and his .46 Dominator Rating offers an indication of his red zone value and an important reminder that some possession receivers score more often than others. The red flags on Sanu are speed related. Sanu has excellent height, but his 4.67 40 comes at only 211 pounds. His 6.9 yards per target last year at Rutgers is also distressingly low. On the other hand, Sanu’s 11.1 Agility Score is fractions better than diminutive speed receivers Kendall Wright and Chris Givens.

Projected Value: Third Round Projected Selection: Third Round

15. Gerell Robinson

That Robinson only saw 22% of the targets in Arizona St.’s offense last season is a red flag, but he averaged a whopping 12.4 yards per target. The former Sun Devil ran a mildly disappointing 4.6 in the 40 but possesses excellent size at 6’3”, 225”. His 4.15 short shuttle time was faster than Kendall Wright’s.

Projected Value: Third Round Projected Selection: Fourth Round

Just Missed

Ryan Broyles – Absent a torn ACL, Broyles might be talked about in the same breath as Kendall Wright. As was the case with Juron Criner, Broyles’ .35 Dominator Rating bested most of the big name WRs in 2010. Unfortunately, he’s short, relatively slow, and rehabbing a serious injury. If he’s an elite slot receiver three years from now, teams will wonder why Broyles went so late in the 2012 draft.

Junior Hemingway – The former Wolverine wasn’t particularly productive in college, but his workout numbers are impressive, including a video game-like 10.57 Agility Score.

Nick Toon – Toon has excellent size, a 10.4 ypt number his final year in college, and a solid .29 DR.

Marvin Jones – At 199 pounds, Jones’ build is a red flag, but his 4.46 40 and 10.92 Agility Score are encouraging workout numbers. Jones simply didn’t earn a large enough percentage of his team’s receiving production (0.22 DR) to warrant the high ranking given by many scouts.

Bookmark the permalink.

45 Responses to Dominator Rating, Height-Adjusted Speed Score, and WR Draft Rankings

  1. Pingback: If You’re Not Reading Money in the Banana Stand, You’re Missing Out | Fantasy Douche

  2. Benny says:

    What are the chances you have these figs for the 2010 and 2011 draft classes?

    • Shawn Siegele says:

      I’ve got most of the numbers for the significant players. After being shocked at the NFL Draft results (although the 49ers correctly deduced that A.J. Jenkins should be drafted highly), I’m going to do another post or two on the topic in the near future. It’s certainly not that the formula is perfectly oracular in nature, but the predictions are fairly impressive compared with NFL Draft position. Several teams missed big opportunities – even late – to draft players who might have helped. On the other hand, those teams that drafted guys who are both small and were unproductive in college . . . mindboggling.

      • Benny says:

        Thanks. In redraft leagues, I always find it’s more effective to look for the 2nd and 3rd year guys who flew under the radar in their draft classes rather than this year’s rookies. I’ll remember to go back for Jeffrey, Jenkins, Randle and McNutt next year.

        On another note, you have a good point on Stephen Hill: the dominator rating is going to get fooled by a triple option offense, where you usually only have 1 true WR on the field at a time. See Greg Jones at Navy in 2010 and Kevin Fogler at Air Force in 2009. Don’t get fooled by Zack Kauth coming out of AIr Force next year.

  3. Clay says:

    Can you provide the details of your HaSS formula? I’m trying to see how you get these numbers. Great article and thanks!

    • Shawn Siegele says:

      Thanks Clay, I’m going to have a couple more articles on HaSS soon and a little more info on how I get the numbers. Sorry for the delay in getting back to you.

  4. Jon says:

    Shawn,
    What is your email? I’d like to exchange some more thoughts about this stuff, particularly production trends, your ‘dominator’ rating, and more.

    • Shawn Siegele says:

      Hey Jon, you can reach me at shawn@moneyinthebananastand.com. I’ve actually got a couple of columns ready for non-rookies based on DR and HaSS; a breakout column and a red flags column. I meant to have the stuff out earlier, but I’ve gotten bogged down with some other original research and some stuff I did for the Pro Football Focus Draft Guide.

      I’m headed out camping for the next week, but send me something and I’ll get back to you as soon as I can. The site should have a bunch of content a little later in August.

  5. MRT says:

    I just discovered this site and it is unbelievable. I’m a huge numbers guy, loves statistical models, love football (both real and fantasy) and was a big fan of Arrested Development. This is great stuff.

    • Shawn Siegele says:

      Thanks, MRT. I’ve been working on a lot of my own original research and stuff for Pro Football Focus, so the articles have been thin lately, but Money in the Banana Stand will have a ton of content this fall. Tell your friends! Also, with the news that Arrested Development is shooting new episodes, all is right with the world.

  6. Pingback: Marquise Goodwin and the Hilarity of Scouting - Money in the Banana Stand | Money in the Banana Stand

  7. Pingback: Questioning Market Share: The Hunter-Patterson Comparison | RotoViz

  8. Pingback: Stedman Bailey and Second-Round Productivity: The Next Isaac Bruce? | RotoViz

  9. Pingback: A Tale of Two Beasts (Part I – Mark Harrison) | RotoViz

  10. Pingback: The 2013 RotoViz Composite Rookie WR Rankings! | RotoViz

  11. Pingback: Dominator Rating, Height-Adjusted Speed Score, and the 2013 Receiver Class | Money in the Banana Stand

  12. Pingback: 2013 NFL Draft Skill Position Rookie Rankings ← Sports Wunderkind

  13. Pingback: Rapid Reaction: DeAndre Hopkins, WR, Houston Texans ← Sports Wunderkind

  14. Pingback: Draft Grades – New York Jets | RotoViz

  15. Pingback: A New Running Back Model to Rank the 2013 Draft Class | RotoViz

  16. Pingback: 2013 Rookie Receiver Rankings | Money in the Banana Stand

  17. Pingback: Teresa Palmer, Adrian Peterson, and the Occasional Value of Being Wrong | Money in the Banana Stand

  18. Pingback: Rap Battle: Randall Cobb (Part 1) | RotoViz

  19. Pingback: Rap Battle: The Case Against Randall Cobb | RotoViz

  20. Pingback: A Look At The Baltimore Raven's WR2 Options Sports Wunderkind

  21. Pingback: Geno Smith, Stephen Hill and The Deep Ball Sports Wunderkind

  22. Pingback: DeMarco Murry, Mike Wallace, and the Impact of Training Camp Scuttlebutt on Undervalued/Overvalued | RotoViz

  23. Pingback: Michael Floyd and Rueben Randle: Projecting WR Breakouts Using the Dominator Rating and Height-adjusted Speed Score | RotoViz

  24. Pingback: Is Marcus Easley the Next Miles Austin?—And What Exactly Does the Preseason Mean? (Part 2) | RotoViz

  25. Pingback: Pai Mei, Zero RB, and the NFFC – A 2013 Report Card | Money in the Banana Stand

  26. Pingback: The Wideout Report: Week 15, Andre Holmes, and Silver Linings Playbook | RotoViz

  27. Pingback: Kapri Bibbs, Ryan Grant, and the 2013-14 Bowl Season: What is the Elvish Word for “Awesome”? | RotoViz

  28. Pingback: The Wideout Report: Week 16, Michael Crabtree, and the Ghost of Old King Hamlet (Act III) | RotoViz

  29. Pingback: 2014 NFL Draft: Sammy Watkins, Mike Evans, and the Early Wide Receiver Rankings | RotoViz

  30. Pingback: What’s This Then? Dominator Rating and Breakout Age | RotoViz

  31. Pingback: Dominator Rating & Breakout Age: Visualizing 2014′s Wide Receivers | RotoViz

  32. Pingback: Great Young NFL Receivers Were Probably Also Great Young College Receivers | RotoViz

  33. Pingback: Sammy Watkins, Mike Evans an Age Adjusted Dominator Rating for 2014 WR Prospects | RotoViz

  34. Pingback: Visualizing Age Adjusted Dominator Rating for 2014 Prospects | RotoViz

  35. Pingback: Martin Mayhew Thinks Matthew Stafford Was the Problem (and other absurdities) | Money in the Banana Stand

  36. Pingback: Dynasty Fantasy Football: 10 Post-Hype Super Sleepers | RotoViz

  37. Pingback: The Thinking Man’s Guide to 40 Times at the 2014 NFL Combine | RotoViz

  38. Pingback: The WR Prospect Sweet Sixteen: (4) Odell Beckham vs (13) Martavis Bryant | RotoViz

  39. Pingback: Freak Scores for the 2014 WR Class | RotoViz

  40. Pingback: Dynasty Fantasy Football: Top 20 Deep Sleepers for 2014 | RotoViz

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>